More on Echo Park

by Louis Jacinto

My last entry explained how I came to live across the street from the beautiful Echo Park Lake in Los Angeles while in college.  I lived there from 1978 – 1984.

Here I’m sharing some pictures I took of the lake in June of 1981.  Appearing in some of the images is Roberto Moreno, one of my closest friends from my college days.

Roberto and I had some wonderful adventures together, both in and out of Echo Park.

Just click on each image for a larger, more detailed view.

Image

This is a view of the Boat House

Image

The apartment complex in the center of this image is where I lived, at the very top of the hill.  Spectacular views!

Image

My friends would always humor me when I would ask them to pose for me.  Roberto was always ready to go along with my ideas, but he always added his own little touch when I would photograph him.

Image

This was directly across the street from my apartment.  The palm trees in Echo Park Lake are just majestically beautiful!

Image

A beautiful statue, my old friend!

Image

Folks were always fishing in the lake.  It is an oasis in the middle of town!

Image

This is my Duchamp!

You are not looking at the urinals in the Echo Park Lake men’s room, you are looking at a photograph!

Image

The Lotus in Echo Park are just so beautiful!  Unfortunately, these lovely plants died off.  Fortunately, someone had taken a few home and grew them and the City was able to replant them in the lake.  The lotus have returned to Echo Park.

Image

Image

Roberto sitting at the water’s edge in a hollowed out tree stump.

ImageThese two images are on the base of the statue at the lake.  One of Echo Park’s most beloved icons sculpted in the Art  Deco style by artist  Ada Mae Sharpless,  the statue’s official  name is “Nuestra Reina de Los Angeles” (Queen of the Angels).  But most people refer to the statue as the “Lady of the Lake.”   Sharpless was  awarded this art  commission by the federal Works Progress Administration in 1934, a Depression-era program that commissioned works of public art.  Originally intended  to be cast in bronze,  the 14-foot-high cast stone statue  was given as a gift to  the city of Los Angeles  in 1935. Image

Image

Now go and visit Echo Park Lake to see the beautiful restoration.

Advertisements